Sons of Ireland's TOP HIP HOP SINGLES


Cobe Obeah Cobe Obeah - “Director's Cut”

“How appropriate that the sound has an epic feel to it in accordance with the title, "Director's Cut." It feels very complete, like an end credit song that wraps up a finely directed film. There is definitely a sense of immense, colossal passion. Wanting something so badly that nothing will stop you. And I think when the sound of the song can accomplish that foundation, what follows is a exquisite display of craftsmanship. His delivery was on point, lyrics brought an inspirational vibe, and execution was dead on. I agree with someone that said that the vocal could use more emotion. He did sound a bit monotone to be honest. The song is dope.”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 25, 2010
F.a.T F.a.T - “Hungry [Premiere]”

“The piano is very 36th Chamber-esque to me. Hehe, the hook is on fire. Such a good counterpart to the face-paced, blazing delivery of Jansen. He pays so much attention to the right pause, the right stress, and how much to tweak in between. I'll tell you, this guy is hungry for sure. You can feel the hunger from his passionate, almost furious approach to each line. Biting, spitting, really challenging the mic and himself and match his effort to equally fantastic production. A well-trained student of the art of hip-hop indeed. Can't wait for more.”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 23, 2010
Archie Eversole Archie Eversole - “Lil Lower”

“What the hell is that? Harp? I don't care, the beat is money. I do have a bit of a soft spot for electronica, and when the beat sets the vibe of the song, I am in. The aura envisioned by the beat is like a shining star on a northern sky. It doesn't hurt that Eversole is representing A-town (hell yeah!), and he brings that dirty south club flow to the almost ethereal sound. And goddamn, just when you thought this shit couldn't get more ill, the female vocal accentuates the overall tone of the song even more. A sublime blend of masculine and feminine sound. Ying and yang at its best. Banger for sure.”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 23, 2010
Styles Ain't Raw Promo Photo Celph Titled - “Styles Ain't Raw”

“All I can say is, "Oh, shit, Chino XL!" It's got that classic hip-hop feel to it. Vintage, laid-back, and just right. The beat is orchestrated beautifully by all three rappers. Celph kills it for sure. I just loved the collaborative effort that came from all of them. Solid, solid, solid. Flowing like a river. These three sound like veterans who've done what they're doing for so long they make it sound casual. A trio nailing their delivery. Who can argue with that, right?”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 23, 2010
Styles Ain't Raw Promo Photo Apathy - “Styles Ain't Raw”

“All I can say is, "Oh, shit, Chino XL!" It's got that classic hip-hop feel to it. Vintage, laid-back, and just right. The beat is orchestrated beautifully by all three rappers. Celph kills it for sure. I just loved the collaborative effort that came from all of them. Solid, solid, solid. Flowing like a river. These three sound like veterans who've done what they're doing for so long they make it sound casual. A trio nailing their delivery. Who can argue with that, right?”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 23, 2010
Styles Ain't Raw Promo Photo Chino XL - “Styles Ain't Raw”

“All I can say is, "Oh, shit, Chino XL!" It's got that classic hip-hop feel to it. Vintage, laid-back, and just right. The beat is orchestrated beautifully by all three rappers. Celph kills it for sure. I just loved the collaborative effort that came from all of them. Solid, solid, solid. Flowing like a river. These three sound like veterans who've done what they're doing for so long they make it sound casual. A trio nailing their delivery. Who can argue with that, right?”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 23, 2010
Freddie Gibbs Freddie Gibbs - “Personal OG”

“Nothing much to say here as others have already said the beautiful delivery. It's like he's not even rapping... it's so natural it sounds like he is literally talking... The only issue I have is the chorus, and that is a minor complaint. It does have that getting sucked into the depths of the ocean after you've hit the surface from jumping. A slow, trippy, psychedelic jump. As DJ Brookllen mentioned lol. Sit back, chill, and let this man take you on a flowetric journey.”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 23, 2010
Everliven Sound Everliven Sound - “What Should He Do”

“The feel-good vibe of the beat is just sweet as hell. For some reason, I'm getting a groovy Chi-town imagery in my head. The foregone days of pimps and hustlers, dancing to the everyday rhythm of Chicago life. Great combination of multi-liners and single-liners. Really brings the song together with the whole-verse rhyme. And the "yo yo yo yo yo... " at the end, heheh. Pure fun right there. Man, just good old hip hop sound, like a fine home-cooked meal. I need some yam and sweet potato pie lol.”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 23, 2010
Knuckle Up Promo Photo Shane Eli - “Knuckle Up”

“LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the drums!!! Sounds like ?uestlove on crack! Haha. The funky structure of lyrics is money. With each beat, Eli's spit elevates the sound to sonic nirvana. Can you feel the charged-up pitch of the voice on chorus? That shit is hot! A little bassier on verses, which I don't mind, and the delivery is not forced (AND doesn't sound forced) so that he gets drowned in the brawling beat. As others mentioned, this is a song where you can really tell the quality production involved. Kanye-esque influence, with a bit of electronica and a whole lot of attitude. Shane Elie killed it, man.”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 23, 2010
Wale Wale - “BASEhead”

“Beautiful flow here. The delivery is on time, rhythmically spoken with precision. The mechanical aspect of the song is just spot on. I thought the beat was great in a sense that it really allowed Wale's voice to stand out. The knell of the bell was like an omen of what was to come. @ DJ Brookllen, your comment about the NFL analogy was dead on. I had more of a Ragnarok, Odin imagery, but I like your description of the bell as well. Each bar opened up a room ready to be decorated, and Wale just jam-packed it with rap decor. Mad props to this man.”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 23, 2010
B.o.B B.o.B - “Airplanes (Pt. 2)”

“The song feels like the initial struggle of an underdog. In Contrast to part one, this song embodies perseverance against the inertia of doubt and disbelief. The subtlety of piano now caresses the sharp beat, giving the song a hint of flashback. We are really listening to the past of Bobby Ray. I think what Eminem brings to the song with his verse is that shade of anger evident in so many of his songs. With struggle comes anger. And the transition from Bobby Ray to Eminem before the last verse is a testament to that uncertainty. Not knowing whether you will make it. Doubt always creeps up on you no matter how confident you are. It is a part of realizing your dream. If part one was of celebration, then part two is its grim twin. This song speaks the reality of Bobby Ray's rising stardom. That there were indeed dark times during his continuing journey. Let go, but never forget.”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 21, 2010
Eminem Eminem - “Airplanes (Pt. 2)”

“The song feels like the initial struggle of an underdog. In Contrast to part one, this song embodies perseverance against the inertia of doubt and disbelief. The subtlety of piano now caresses the sharp beat, giving the song a hint of flashback. We are really listening to the past of Bobby Ray. I think what Eminem brings to the song with his verse is that shade of anger evident in so many of his songs. With struggle comes anger. And the transition from Bobby Ray to Eminem before the last verse is a testament to that uncertainty. Not knowing whether you will make it. Doubt always creeps up on you no matter how confident you are. It is a part of realizing your dream. If part one was of celebration, then part two is its grim twin. This song speaks the reality of Bobby Ray's rising stardom. That there were indeed dark times during his continuing journey. Let go, but never forget.”

Sons of Ireland's Rating:                     Posted on Apr 21, 2010

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